Thursday, April 18, 2013

Goodnight Books

     
     Reading books has always been part of our activities with our kids. My husband and I make it a point to read to Audrey, and even Natalie, at least once a day. It not only helps them learn new things or expand their vocabulary, but promotes bonding as well. 
     I remember being so excited when at around a year and nine months, Audrey started 'filling out the blanks' when we read her books she was familiar with. She actually knew the words! Two of those books which she gladly recited along with us was Goodnight Moon and The Going to Bed Book. Since we read them to her almost every night, she already knew the words at the end of practically every phrase. And we noticed that it was so much easier for her to remember when they were rhyming.
     The pictures in the books were also very helpful and were an essential part of why she remembered the words. Whenever we read to her, we would point to the corresponding illustration so that she knew what the word stood for. It gave her a clue whenever she would forget. 
       Here are our favorite nighttime and winding down books and why we love them.


Count to Sleep Seattle,
The Going to Bed Book by Sandra Boynton
and the classic Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown


Goodnight Moon was an instant favorite. I first encountered this book through my friend
Vit as she read it to her son Diego. She would read and point to the 'light' and 'red balloon'
and Diego would be able to identify it and read along with her. And this
actually gave me the idea of filling out the blanks while reading with Audrey when
I had her a few years later :) Thanks Vit!

This book has both colored and black and white (or monochromatic) illustrations. I'm not sure why this is so but I noticed that it helped me remember the order of the story whenever I had to recite it from memory :D


We actually bought Goodnight Moon even while Audrey was in my tummy and started reading it to her then.
We did the same with Natalie :) 


These are pages from Count to Sleep Seattle, a book given by my sister in law, Mic
to Audrey when we visited them in Washington last year before Audrey turned two.
It's a good book for her to remember our trip by and the places we went to, and the things we saw. 
It also helps her learn how to count :) At the end of this book are illustrations of children sleeping 
in their beds and we often make Audrey point out which of these kids are her cousins in Seattle :) 
And of course she will also point out which one of them she is! :)



The Going to Bed Book was a book that I got from Seattle as well but I've seen it being sold here. It is a cute bedtime book with nice illustrations and a funny story. It's one of Audrey's favorites :)
We read this mostly at night but also at any time of the day!



   
     Nowadays Audrey can recite sentences from the books that we read to her - and she can even read along! All it takes is reading the book to her a couple of times and she catches on. Good to know her memory is pretty good :)
    Sometimes I would also catch her opening her books and pretending to read :) More often than not, the stories that she makes up correspond correctly to the page in the book! She already knows the story probably both through memory and from the illustrations. It is really amusing and rewarding at the same time :) So I encourage you - if you haven't yet - to read books to and with your toddler! You'll be surprised how quickly they catch on and learn :)
   

2 comments:

  1. Cute! I have the same Good night books for Bash. Try to look for the "Goodnight, Gorilla" too. It's fun to read to them and describe what's in each page... then afterwards, they'll imitate how you read and describe the story to them. Now, when it's bed time for Bash, I'll ask her, "who will read tonight? Mama or Bash?" Most of the time, she'd volunteer, then she can edit/make up her own story na rin. Kaaliw lang. :)

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  2. We have Goodnight Gorilla too :) My preschool teacher friend recommended it for that reason - so you can make your own story and describe what you see to them, and encourage them to do the same. Glad to hear Bash loves to read too! :)

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